BOOK, BLOG & ONLINE COURSE BY MARTIN RUHS

Labour immigration policy: What do we want, and why?

I spend a lot of my time talking to journalists and policy-makers about labour immigration. In that context, I am often asked if labour immigration and/or a particular labour immigration policy is “good” or “bad”.

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Can't change one without the other': Reforming labour immigration and labour markets in the Gulf States

The Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) States in the Middle East (Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates) have over the past fifty years been among the largest importers of migrant workers in the world. In recent years, these countries have been talking about the need to reduce their reliance on migrant labour? Why? And can it be done?

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Britain's growing reliance on migrant labour: Inevitability or policy choice?

Britain’s reliance on migrant workers is not – as is sometimes argued – simply a consequence of lax immigration controls. Neither can it be reduced to ‘exploitative employers’, ‘lazy Britons won’t do the work’, or ‘migrants are needed for economic recovery’.

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Swedish Exceptionalism

Most high income countries’ labour immigration policies have, over the past few years, become more selective in terms of who they admit – with most countries prioritising skilled over low-skilled labour immigration – and more restrictive in terms of the scale of annual admissions of migrant workers. Since 2008, Sweden has been going in the opposite direction. Its new policies do not differentiate between low and high skilled immigration and are aimed at increasing the number of migrant workers. What explains this Swedish exceptionalism? The answer suggests some interesting lessons for other countries.

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